Ships in Quarantine and Passenger lists

Diseases and Quarantine. In general if there was active disease on board the Otago Medical Officer would be notified by the ships doctor and all quarantined. Sometimes the sick or well stayed on the ship. The last quarantined person that died on the island was in 1916 (over 100 years ago). No bacteria, virus or spore could survive until today.

Diseases:

Smallpox. A virus. This had been a devastating disease until widespread immunisation in the early 1800’s. Prior to immunisatoion, typically 60% were infected and 10-30% died during epidemics. For some people the immunisation did not work, thus occasional cases occurred until 1975. Today, smallpox is eradicated.

Measles. A virus. Today, it is aimed to eliminate this worldwide by immunisation. However humanitarian issues in some countries have delayed worldwide immunisation. It still causes problems in localised epidemics, particularly if immunisation rates are low (e.g. Samoa 2019).

Diptheria/Croup. Bacteria. Infects the throat. Today, immunisation is used.

Typhoid. Bacteria. Today, immunization is used.

Scarlet fever/Scarlatina. Bacteria. Starts as ‘Strep sore throat’. Bacteria infect the throat then  spread throughout the body. Today, it is treated by antibiotics (since 1940’s).

Whooping cough. Bacteria. Today immunisation works. It is more common in babies before immunisation. There were 1300 cases in NZ in 2017 and there are still approximately 1one death per year.

This Table has some information about the ships, diseases, and some coments.

If you want to search for a particular person who came to NZ 1839-1973 you can search the NZ archives through FamilySearch

Year Monthh Datey Days in Q Ship Name Port of Departure Diseases Comments
1860 Sept 3 7 Robert Henderson Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland scarlet fever List. Ship from the Henderson line.
1860 Oct 26 ½ Silistria Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland smallpox List
1863 July 12 31+ Victory Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland smallpox List. First people to use the 1861 Quarantine buildings
1863 Sept 14 29 Mataura Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland smallpox, scarlet fever
1863 Dec 5 2 Daniel Rankin Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland smallpox
1864 Sept 23 4 City of Dunedin Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland fever
1866 Sept 21 26 Resolute Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland smallpox
1867 Oct 12 1 Echunga Gravesend, London, England smallpox
1868 Feb 18 7 Fairy Queen Mauritius, Africa fever
1868 Apr 2 6 Centaur Mauritius, Africa fever
1870 Dec 23 13 Robert Henderson Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland scarlatina (scarlet fever)
1872 Dec 5 11+ Christian McCausland Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland scarlatina (scarlet fever) First to use the not quite completed 1873 buildings. Diary entry from Charles Duke ”Barracks Master’ on the Island
1872 Dec 6 17+ Palmerston Hamburg, Germany scarlatina (scarlet fever) Diary.
Carried many Polish immigrants
1873 Feb 16 4+ Charlotte Gladstone Gravesend, London, England typhoid 338  passengers to Otago, Diary available‘the dirtest looking old tub that ever visited our harbour’
1873 Nov 6 7+ Lady Jocelyn Gravesend, London, England diphtheria 198 passengers to Otago
1874 Feb 13 28+ SS Mongol Plymouth, England scarlet fever Ship with the most deaths on the Island (11 deaths).  The first steam ship to bring immigrants  to NZ. Was being delivered as a mail ship.Made the fastest voyage to NZ (54 days)Left Plymouth on the same day as the Scimitar
1874 Feb 28 9+ Carnatic London, England scarlet fever, measles
1874 Mar 5 13+ Scimitar Plymouth, England scarlet fever, measles Had 762 immigrants on board and of that number 280 were children.  There was much sickness on board and before New Zealand was reached there were 33 deaths, all except one infants. Six more died in quarantine. Ship later named the Rangitiki.
1874 June 8 9 SS Atrato Plymouth, England measles, croup/diptheria
1875 Jan 10 5 Margaret Galbraith Grenock, Glasgow, Scotland scarlet fever
1875 Feb 12 10+ Gareloch London, England scarlet fever
1875 Feb 17 15+ Oamaru Grenock, Glasgow, Scotland scarlet fever
1875 July 25 6+ Aldergrove Glasgow, Scotland measles Official enquiry results regarding rations and the doctors intoxication.
1875 Sept 30 1+ Invercargill Grenock, Glasgow, Scotland whooping cough The Invercargill made 26 trips to NZ.
1876 Feb 6 5 Corona London, England typhoid
1876 Nov 19 8+ Dunedin Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland measles Refitted with refrigeration (1881) made the first trip to engand with frozen meat in 1882.
1876 Dec 16 6+ Oamaru Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland measles, fever
1877 Mar 25 29 Gloucester Hong Kong, China smallpox Carrying workers from China.  Of 122 passengers, all male, 4 still had smallpox. Stayed in tents on the Island.
1877 Nov 21 9 Waipa Plymouth, England scarlet fever
1877 Dec 30 17 Canterbury Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland typhoid
1879 Mar 24 11 Lyttelton Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland scarlatina (scarlet fever)
1879 Oct 2 7 Forfarshire London, England diphtheria
1879 Dec 23 6+ Auckland Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland measles
1880 Jan 7 5+ Marlborough Greenock, Glasgow, Scotland measles
1881 June 29 17 Charles Worsley London, England smallpox
1885 May 8 6 Arawa Plymouth, England smallpox
1887 Jan 29 7 Ruapehu Plymouth, England scarlatina (scarlet fever)
1889 Aug 28 5 Coptic Plymouth, England scarlatina (scarlet fever)
1892 Jan 19 51 Umvoti Mauritius, Africa smallpox Longest time in Quarantine
1894 May 23 21 Rimutaka London, England scarlet fever
1902 Aug 5 13 Orient Capetown, South Africa measles, smallpox Returning liner/troopship from the second Boer war. Twenty-one of the 1102 soldiers on board were quarantined for measles, a solider on this ship was later found to have smallpox.
1916 May 16 14 Willochra London, England smallpox Returning liner/troopship from WW1. Several soldiers were found to have smallpox. The ship was diverted and soldiers quarantined.  Private Wilson died and was in the Island cemetery until 1947. The Willochra  played an important role as a troopship in WW1

List of diaries of immigrants available at the Alexander Turnbull Library

Lists of ships and people that came to Port Chalmers

Known burials in the Island Cemetery, about 70 remain, mosting in unmarked garves

1. William KELLY, age 18 months, 18 July 1863, Victory.
2. Janet KAY (née Anderson), July 1863, Victory.
3. [John] DICKSON, age [52], [30] July 1863, Victory. [See note below]
4. Jessie MOIR, age early 20s, September 1863, Mataura.
5. Hugh TAIT, 23 September 1864, consumption, City of Dunedin.
6. Elizabeth Ann DOUGALL, age 7, 12 November 1865, daugther of Keeper (John Dougall).
7. — BATHGATE, girl, age under 5, 26 December 1870, Robert Henderson.
8.* William DOUGALL, age 5, 30 January 1871, scarlatina, son of Keeper.
9.* William PRESTON, age 28, 22 February 1873, typhoid fever, Charlotte Gladstone.
10.* Robert MAIR [Muir], age 21⁄2, 27 February, 1873, convulsions, Charlotte Gladstone.
11.* George SANDFORD [Sanford], age 17, 28 Feb 1873, consumption, Charlotte Gladstone
12.* James BENNETT, age 19, 1 March 1873, typhoid fever, Charlotte Gladstone.
13.* Laura PIKE, age 2, 6 November 1873, diphtheria, Lady Jocelyn.
14.* George BARNES, age 12 months, 10 November 1873, diphtheria, Lady Jocelyn.
15.* George PEERLESS, age 18, 10 November 1873, convulsive seizure, Lady Jocelyn.
16.* Lilly KEEBLE, age 5, 18 Novembe 1873, diphtheria, Lady Jocelyn.
17.* Charles FEELICK [i.e. William FELLICK], age 7, 19 Nov. 1873, diphtheria, Lady Jocelyn.
18. WITHYMAN (small boy), 1873, Lady Jocelyn.

(Feb 13th 1974 Mongol passengers put into Quarantine)
19.* Ada Johnstone [i.e. JOHNSON], age 3, 14 February 1874, scarlet fever, Mongol.
20.* Julia HIGGS, age 12 months, 14 February 1874, measles, Mongol.
21.* Charles TRIPP, age 10 months, 14 February 1874, bronchitis, Mongol.
22.* Elizabeth WITHAM, age 12 months, 21 February 1874, bronchitis, Mongol.
23.* Mabel HUSBAND, age 3, 3 March 1874, convulsions, Mongol.
24.* Mary Johnston [i.e. Mary Jane JOHNSON], age 9, 9 March 1874, laryngitis, Mongol.
25.* Charles CORNWELL, age 3, 21 March 1874, bronchitis, Mongol.
26.* Carls PARTEL, age 2 months, 26 March 1874, bronchitis, Mongol.
27.* Jane GARDINER, age 10 months, 30 March 1874, bronchitis, Mongol.
28.* Margaret TANNER, age 17, 30 March 1874, bronchitis, diphtheria, Mongol,
29.* Ann TANNER, age 20, 31 March 1874, bronchitis, diphtheria, Mongol.
30.* David [i.e. Albert] COX, age 3, 13 March 1874, scarlet fever, Carnatic.
31.* William WITHERS, age 8, 10 April 1874, water on the brain, scarlet fever, Scimitar.
32.* Eliza WELLEN[?], age 1, 9 June 1874, pneumonia, Atrato.
33.* William Henry REEVE, age 2, 9 June 1874, croup, Atrato.
34.* Florence Emily NEWBURY, age 20 months, 11 June 1874, bronchitis, Atrato.
35.* Mary BROPHY, age 11 months, 12 June 1874, croup and syncope, Atrato.
36.* Charles JONES, age 1 year, 12 June 1874, convulsions, teething coma, Atrato.
37.* Emma JONES, age 2, 12 June 1874, bronchitis, Atrato.
38.* — RICHMOND, age 5 weeks, 3 August 1874, general debility & wasting, ship unknown.
39. — AZZERETI, male baby, age 1 day, 27 October 1875, ship unknown.
40.* Jane MACDONALD, age 33, 28 October 1875, phthisis pulmondia, Auckland.
41. Richard Wetherell SMITH, age 16 months, 1 October 1875; reburied 25 September 1877
at Green Island Cemetery, and incorrectly recorded as having died 1877; Invercargill.
42* Hannah HAlliMAn [i.e. HALLINAN], nee Murphy, age 35, 7 February 1876, parturition,
Corona.
43* Kate McMAsters [i.e. Catherine McMASTER, Mrs], age 27, 18 December 1876,
miscarriage, Oamaru.
44. — BENNET (newborn baby), [December] 1876, Oamaru.
45. Janet BENNET (nee Hunter), [December 1876 or early 1877]. There is doubt about her
burial at the Island or at East Taieri Cemetery, Oamaru.
46* Elizabeth COULTER (née Graham), age 30, 21 January 1878, typhoid fever, Canterbury.

47. Unnamed seaman from Manila, 31 December 1877, scurvy, Carl Ludovic/Ludwig.
48* Catherine McKENNA, age 18, 27 November 1878, typhoid, pneumonia, [?Timaru].
49. — WRIGHT (stillborn baby), 5 October 1879, Forfarshire.
50* Mary WRIGHT (née Boyd), age 37, 7 October 1879, premature labour, Forfarshire.
51* Sarah BATEY, age 41⁄2. 7 January 1880, measles, bronchitis, Marlborough.
52* John CAMERON, age 8 months, 12 January 1880, intermittent diarrhoea, Marlborough.

53* William CRUICKSHANK, age 21 months, 12 January 1880, diarrhoea, Marlborough.
54* Mary WELSH, age 11 months, 16 January 1880, intermittent diarrhoea, Marlborough.
55* Peter John CLARK, age 4 months, 18 January 1880, stoppage of bowels, Marlborough.

56* Elizabeth SINCLAIR, age 2 yrs 7 mths, 18 January 1880, hydrocephalus, Marlborough.

57* Margaret DOUGALL, age 24, 27 December 1884, desquamation, nephritis; dau. of Keeper.

58* John DOUGALL, age 63, 7 January 1890, apoplexy & coma; Keeper of Quarantine.
59* Frederick Griffith RAMSDEN, age 2, 9 January 1890, scarlatina. [?Manapouri].
60. Unnamed seaman from Mauritius, 18 or 19 January, 1892, smallpox, Umvoti.
61. — HARRIS [?], small boy, 3 June 1894, scarlet fever, Rimutaka.
62. George WILSON, Pte, Otago Regiment, 22 May 1916, smallpox, reburied in Soldiers’
Ground, Andersons Bay Cemetery, Dunedin, 15 October 1947, Willochra.

NOTES:

  1. a)  Fuller entries, compiled by June McDougall, NZSG, are in Fiche No.386 of the N.Z.Society of Genealogists’ master microfiche of cemeteries, 1985 (held in most N.Z. research centres).
  2. b)  Asterisks (*) denote original entries in the Port Chalmers Post Of ce Register of Deaths. Only 45 names were included in that Register. Information about another 17 burials has been gathered from newspapers and family informants. All of these sources, when checked against one another and passenger lists, contain some proven inaccuracies. Details for No.3 were added later from a family gravestone in the Clarendon cemetery, Otago.
  3. c)  There have been 72 burials at the Island, two of them (Nos. 41 & 62) later reburied elsewhere. That total of 72 was given by Will Dougall, son of Keeper John Dougall, in a letter to the Otago Daily Times on 10 July 1947. ‘No records have been kept,’ he wrote, ‘but I am in a position to know the facts.’ If it were not for this letter, no one would now know the full number.
  4. d)  Out of the 62 named burials, 40 were children under 10 years, and at least 30 of these were under 5 years. In Dunedin’s Arthur Street Reserve, where a monument records the names of those buried there in Dunedin’s 1st cemetery, a second plaque was added in 2001 honouring the memory of all children who had died aboard ship during the early emigrant voyages. The wording could well have been extended to cover also those children who died on Quarantine Island and at the Caversham Immigration Barracks, still suffering from the effects of the voyage.
  5. e) Most who died at sea were buried at sea. However, eleven passengers and two crewmen buried at Quarantine Island are known to have died on board ship just outside the Heads or within Otago Harbour: Nos. 5, 15, 32, 33, 35, 36, 40, 42, 47, 49, 50, 51 and 60.

References

Quarantine Island a Short History (2008)

The Voyage Out (2005) https://teara.govt.nz/en/the-voyage-out/print